Tag: Andrew Velazquez

Yankees clean up 40-man roster ahead of 60-day IL activation

The Yankees have to activate a number of players from the 60-day injured list this weekend, and to do so, they had to make room on the 40-man roster beforehand. The team got a head start with Brett Gardner and Darren O’Day yesterday, and this afternoon, a few more moves were made official:

Once the Yankees activate Zack Britton, Luke Voit, Miguel Andújar, Clint Frazier, and Aaron Hicks from the 60-day IL, the 40-man roster will stand at 39 players. That number could decrease to 38 if the club declines Joely Rodríguez’s contract option. That will be resolved by Sunday.

Advertisements

Game 124: It’s the Twins, do we really need to explain what happened?

Not sure if I can trust a Win Probability Chart that didn’t have the Yankees’ odds of beating the Twins at 100% to start the game.

Surprise, surprise. The Yankees toppled Minnesota once again, this time to the tune of a 7-1 score. It’s too bad tomorrow’s forecast is no good, because another nice easy victory would have been fun to watch. Anyway, this afternoon’s victory brings the Yankees to 20 games over .500 for the first time this season.

Since I mentioned the forecast, I’m going to keep today’s takeaways brief. We’re trying to prepare ourselves for the impending hurricane at my home, so I don’t have a ton of time to really dig into this game anyway. Besides, how much is there really to say about another beatdown of the Twins?

Game 119: Montgomery returns in yet another nailbiter

If we’ve learned one thing from 2021, it’s that the Yankees will never, ever let us breathe.  In the first game of this split double-header against the Boston Red Sox, the Yankees once again took it down to the wire to secure a 5-3 win in seven innings and pull within one game of the Red Sox in the AL East and Wild Card standings.  To the takeaways –

The Magnificent Middle Infield [2021 Season Preview]

Embed from Getty Images

The Keystone King

Yankees fans everywhere exhaled a collective sigh of relief on the morning of January 15. On that day, which will hopefully not live in infamy, represented the end of a too-long tango between the team’s front office and DJ LeMahieu, when the 32-year-old re-signed for 6-years and $90 million. The idea of an offense without LeMahieu – who led the team in batting average, on-base percentage, wRC+, and WAR over the last two years – was the baseball equivalent of existential dread, so the news of his return may well have been the best possible news for Yankees fans this off-season.

LeMahieu’s excellence in pinstripes cannot be overstated, either. He’s 12th in the majors in fWAR since the beginning of 2019, sandwiched between Ronald Acuña Jr. and JT Realtmuto. His 146 wRC+ is 10th, just behind reigning NL MVP Cody Bellinger. And his .336 batting average, passé as it may be, is the best in the business. LeMahieu has been nothing short of elite in pinstripes, and I can’t wait to see what he’ll do next.

Speaking of, let’s check-in on the projection systems:

SystemPAHRAVG/OBP/SLG (+)WAR
PECOTA64419.295/.360/.450 (122 DRC+)4.6
ZiPS59818.306/.357/.463 (117 wRC+)4.2
Steamer68321.294/.353/.453 (114 wRC+)3.8

All three projection systems are essentially splitting the difference between LeMahieu’s last season in Colorado (87 wRC+) and his first season in the Bronx (135 wRC+), and I’m not all that surprised. After all, he’s 32 and has more than four times as many plate appearances in Colorado. And, given that 2020 was heavily abbreviated, his back-to-back career years involve just 871 PA. I would be at least a bit disappointed in any of those lines – though, all three would be rock solid.

That said: I’m betting the over.

Thoughts on LeMahieu, pitching, and more as snow falls in the New York area

Embed from Getty Images

It’s been a while since any of us has shared a thoughts post, hasn’t it? Not like there’s been much going on in the Yankees’ universe, anyway. We have heard a bit more from the team in the media of late, whether it’s appearances on the YES Network hot stove show or elsewhere. And now that I’ve finished shoveling (twice already), I have some thoughts on what we’ve heard from in recent days, so let’s get to it.

On the latest with DJ LeMahieu. By now you’ve surely seen the reports that the Yankees and DJ LeMahieu are $25 million apart in contract negotiations. Sounds bad, doesn’t it? But really, it’s not. The difference here really is a matter of years, not money. Per the initial NJ.com report, LeMahieu’s camp is seeking $100 million over five seasons, whereas the Yankees prefer four years for $75 million. We’re really talking about one year difference in term and $1.25 million in average annual value.

LeMahieu turns 33 in July and the Yankees’ preference is to have his contract end sooner. That’s always sensible with a player entering his mid-to-late thirties. Meanwhile, LeMahieu wants to scratch out as much as he can since this likely is his final chance to cash in. Also sensible! But perhaps most importantly in this negotiation, both sides have clearly signaled a desire to reunite. At some point, I imagine the Yankees and LeMahieu will compromise on some sort of option for that fifth year.

Now, I must admit all of this admiration and negotiation through the media has grown a little tiring for me. Just get a deal done, already. A blogger needs some news to keep content going, you know.

Even considering my own impatience, I am a little confused about the Yankees unwillingness to do anything until the LeMahieu situation is resolved. The Yankees have something like $30 million of space below the first luxury tax threshold and it’s not like LeMahieu is going to eat up all of that. Sure, he’ll take up a good chunk, but there should still be something like $10 million to play with. I get that the front office isn’t going to turn and sign say, Marcus Semien, since that would eliminate them from retaining LeMahieu. But what about some position player depth? Another relief arm? I don’t know. Again, I’m desperate for something.

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén